Home / World / Olga Ladyzhenskaya Bio, Wiki, Age, Married, Net Worth, Twitter, Instagram, Facts
Olga Ladyzhenskaya Bio

Olga Ladyzhenskaya Bio, Wiki, Age, Married, Net Worth, Twitter, Instagram, Facts

Olga Ladyzhenskaya Bio

March 7th, 2019 – Google Doodle Celebrates Olga Ladyzhenskaya on her 97th Birthday Anniversary. Olga Aleksandrovna Ladyzhenskaya was born March 7th, 1922 and died on January 12th, 2004. She was a Soviet and Russian mathematician known for her work on partial differential equations (especially Hilbert’s 19th problem) and fluid dynamics. She provided the first rigorous proofs of the convergence of a finite difference method for the Navier–Stokes equations. She was a student of Ivan Petrovsky. She was awarded the Lomonosov Gold Medal in 2002.

Olga Ladyzhenskaya Quick Bio

Born She was born on March 7th, 1922 in Kologriv, RSFSR
Died She died on January 12th, 2004 (aged 81) in Saint Petersburg, Russia
Nationality Soviet–Russian
Alma mater Moscow University
Known for Fluid dynamics of the Navier-Stokes equations, Hilbert’s nineteenth problem, Partial differential equations
Awards Lomonosov Gold Medal (2002)
Scientific career
Fields Partial differential equations
Institutions Saint Petersburg University
Doctoral advisor Ivan Petrovsky
Sergei Sobolev
Notable students Nina Uralt’seva
Ludwig Faddeev
Vladimir Buslaev

Olga Ladyzhenskaya Biography

Ladyzhenskaya was born and grew up in Kologriv. She was the daughter of a mathematics teacher who is credited with her early inspiration and love of mathematics. In October 1937 her father was arrested by the NKVD and soon killed.

In 1939, despite leaving secondary school with excellent marks, Olga was forbidden to enter Leningrad State University as her father was thought of as an “enemy of the nation”. She, however, received placement in the Pokrovski Teachers’ Training College, remarkably. It is possible she received this placement partly due to the fact that the state policy had changed during the difficult wartime period. When World War II began she was left with no choice but to leave Leningrad, first moving to Gorodets where she taught in an orphanage, and then moving with her mother and older sister to return to Kologriv. There she taught mathematics at the same local secondary school that her father had previously taught in. Following the same footsteps as her father, she taught not only at school but also at home without pay.

In 1943 she became a student at Moscow State University (MGU) due to the intervention of the mother of one of her pupils who, on returning to Moscow, persuaded the rector to invite Olga to MGU.

At University Olga’s love of mathematics blossomed and she was awarded a Stalin stipend and a labourers ration card without which she would have been unable to survive. It was here where she first started studying algebra, number theory and subsequently partial differential equations. She became interested in the theory of partial differential equations due to the influence of Petrovsky as well as the book by Hilbert and Courant.

After Joseph Stalin died in 1953, Ladyzhenskaya presented her doctoral thesis and was given the degree she had long before earned. She went on to teach at the university in Leningrad and at the Steklov Institute, staying in Russia even after the collapse of the Soviet Union and the rapid salary deflation for professors.

Ladyzhenskaya was on the shortlist for potential recipients for the 1958 Fields Medal, ultimately awarded to Klaus Roth and René Thom.

Olga Ladyzhenskaya Parents

Olga Alexandrovna Ladyzhenskaya’s father was Aleksandr Ivanovich Ladyzhenskii, descended from Russian nobility, and her mother, Anna Mikhailovna, was from Estonia. Olga’s birthplace Kologriv was surrounded by ‘wild’ forests, near the picturesque river Unzha. Her mother was a hard-working housewife, looking after her husband and three daughters of whom Olga was the youngest. She was the closest to her father who was a mathematics teacher and the catalyst for Olga’s life long interest in mathematics.

When Olga was fifteen years old, in 1937, her father was arrested by Stalinist authorities and executed without trial.

Olga Ladyzhenskaya Death and Cause

She died unexpectedly in her sleep on 12 January 2004 shortly before her 82nd birthday. She loved St Petersburg but she was also a sun worshipper and had been due to be in Florida from January 12th during the long dark days of winter in St Petersburg. However, on the eve of 11 January, she went to rest before her long trip and passed away. Two days prior to her death, she was full of expectation when she had sketched a paper on some computational aspects in hydrodynamics and planned to finish it in Florida. Even up till her death was she coping with the challenge of serious eye problems affecting her sight especially during winter darkness so she used special pencils for writing.

Olga Ladyzhenskaya Awards and Recognition

  •  In 1954, and again in 1961, she was awarded the First Prize of the Leningrad State University.
  • In 1969 she received the Chebyshev Prize of the USSR Academy of Sciences and the State Prize of the USSR.
  • She was awarded the S V Kovalevsky prize in 1992, an honorary doctorate from the University of Bonn on May 13th, 2002, and the Golden Lomonosov Medal, the Ioffe Medal, and the St Petersburg University Medal in 2003.
  • In the Museum of Science (Boston, USA) Olga Ladyhenskaya’s name is among other influential mathematicians of the 20th century carved on a large marble desk in the Mathematics Exhibition Hall.

Olga Ladyzhenskaya Husband

Earlier in her life, Olga was briefly married. At the time of her death, she had no immediate survivors.

Olga Ladyzhenskaya Google Doodle

Today, on March 7th, 2019, Google Doodle Celebrates Olga Ladyzhenskaya, a Russian mathematician who triumphed over personal tragedy and obstacles to become one of the most influential thinkers of her generation on her 97th Birthday Anniversary.

Ladyzhenskaya was born and grew up in Kologriv. She was the daughter of a mathematics teacher who is credited with her early inspiration and love of mathematics. In October 1937 her father was arrested by the NKVD and soon killed.

In 1939, despite leaving secondary school with excellent marks, Olga was forbidden to enter Leningrad State University as her father was thought of as an “enemy of the nation”. She, however, received placement in the Pokrovski Teachers’ Training College, remarkably. It is possible she received this placement partly due to the fact that the state policy had changed during the difficult wartime period. When World War II began she was left with no choice but to leave Leningrad, first moving to Gorodets where she taught in an orphanage, and then moving with her mother and older sister to return to Kologriv. There she taught mathematics at the same local secondary school that her father had previously taught in. Following the same footsteps as her father, she taught not only at school but also at home without pay.

In 1943 she became a student at Moscow State University (MGU) due to the intervention of the mother of one of her pupils who, on returning to Moscow, persuaded the rector to invite Olga to MGU.

At University Olga’s love of mathematics blossomed and she was awarded a Stalin stipend and a labourers ration card without which she would have been unable to survive. It was here where she first started studying algebra, number theory and subsequently partial differential equations. She became interested in the theory of partial differential equations due to the influence of Petrovsky as well as the book by Hilbert and Courant.

After Joseph Stalin died in 1953, Ladyzhenskaya presented her doctoral thesis and was given the degree she had long before earned. She went on to teach at the university in Leningrad and at the Steklov Institute, staying in Russia even after the collapse of the Soviet Union and the rapid salary deflation for professors.

Ladyzhenskaya was on the shortlist for potential recipients for the 1958 Fields Medal, ultimately awarded to Klaus Roth and René Thom.

Olga Ladyzhenskaya Parents

Olga Alexandrovna Ladyzhenskaya’s father was Aleksandr Ivanovich Ladyzhenskii, descended from Russian nobility, and her mother, Anna Mikhailovna, was from Estonia. Olga’s birthplace Kologriv was surrounded by ‘wild’ forests, near the picturesque river Unzha. Her mother was a hard-working housewife, looking after her husband and three daughters of whom Olga was the youngest. She was the closest to her father who was a mathematics teacher and the catalyst for Olga’s life long interest in mathematics.

When Olga was fifteen years old, in 1937, her father was arrested by Stalinist authorities and executed without trial.

Olga Ladyzhenskaya Death and Cause

She died unexpectedly in her sleep on 12 January 2004 shortly before her 82nd birthday. She loved St Petersburg but she was also a sun worshipper and had been due to be in Florida from January 12th during the long dark days of winter in St Petersburg. However, on the eve of 11 January, she went to rest before her long trip and passed away. Two days prior to her death, she was full of expectation when she had sketched a paper on some computational aspects in hydrodynamics and planned to finish it in Florida. Even up till her death was she coping with the challenge of serious eye problems affecting her sight especially during winter darkness so she used special pencils for writing.

Olga Ladyzhenskaya Awards and Recognition

  •  In 1954, and again in 1961, she was awarded the First Prize of the Leningrad State University.
  • In 1969 she received the Chebyshev Prize of the USSR Academy of Sciences and the State Prize of the USSR.
  • She was awarded the S V Kovalevsky prize in 1992, an honorary doctorate from the University of Bonn on May 13th, 2002, and the Golden Lomonosov Medal, the Ioffe Medal, and the St Petersburg University Medal in 2003.
  • In the Museum of Science (Boston, USA) Olga Ladyhenskaya’s name is among other influential mathematicians of the 20th century carved on a large marble desk in the Mathematics Exhibition Hall.

Olga Ladyzhenskaya Husband

Earlier in her life, Olga was briefly married. At the time of her death, she had no immediate survivors.

Olga Ladyzhenskaya Google Doodle

Today, on March 7th, 2019, Google Doodle Celebrates Olga Ladyzhenskaya, a Russian mathematician who triumphed over personal tragedy and obstacles to become one of the most influential thinkers of her generation on her 97th Birthday Anniversary.

About Jese Bal

Jese Bal born Nov 9, 1982, is a novelist and poet. He has published novels, volumes of poetry, short stories, and drawings. His works are distinguished by the use of a spare style and have been compared to those of Jorge Luis Borges and Italo Calvino.
Loading...